MY DNA Results

If you’ve read my posts, some time ago I sent a saliva sample to 23 and me and received back a report on my ancestry as well as a report on my health traits. I was happy to find out that I am no more susceptible to alzheimers and cancer than anyone else. Anyway, the ancestry report looks at your DNA and highlights you ancestral origins. This turned up a few interesting points:

Breakdown

99.8% European (99.5% Northern European)

British/Irish 67.2%

French/German 8.4%

Scandinavian 1.4%

Finnish 0.2%

The numbers will never totally add up because there are a large number of genes that will only show as “Broadly North Western European)

Southern European 0.1%

Middle Eastern/North African 0.1%

Oceanian 0.1%

Oceania, including indigenous peoples of Papua New Guinea and Melanesia, was inhabited tens of thousands of years ago by early seafaring people”

To put this into context the very low percentage items relate to three people in my family tree around six to eight generations ago that came from Finland, North Africa and Oceania, of course Oceania was not settled by the west at this time so we are talking about Aborigine, Maori, Tongan/Melanesian. This has given me a new challenge because while I can pinpoint the German and Scandinavian influx to my tree the Finnish, Oceanian and North African additions I am going to struggle with. Lets just say that these came in 9 generations ago, that equates to 512 8 x great grandparents and around 350 years ago, before parish records were fully established.

MY Maternal Haplogroup is V, this as the name suggests is inherited from my mother.

What this means:

Origin and Migrations of Haplogroup V

Recent evidence suggests that the members of haplogroup V descend from a woman who lived in Europe approximately 10,000 years ago. When her ancestors arrived in Europe is more of a mystery. They may have migrated to the west from the Middle East before the last great peak of the Ice Age, which occurred around 20,000 years ago. This wave of cold covered the continental interior in icy tundra and pushed Europe’s human population south into a few temperate enclaves in the south along the Mediterranean. Haplogroup V likely arose in one of these refuges in the Iberian Peninsula, or perhaps in southeastern Europe.

The geographic range of haplogroup V began expanding once consistently warmer conditions arrived about 11,500 years ago. One migration carried it northward along the Atlantic to a low-lying coastal plain rich in game and marine food sources such as seals and sea birds. Known as Doggerland, that region lies under the North Sea today – because so much water was locked up in the polar ice sheets during and immediately after the Ice Age, sea level was lower in the past than it is today.

Doggerland slipped beneath the waves about 9,000 years ago, but haplogroup V remains at levels of about 5% in countries that border the Atlantic and especially the North Sea. It is most abundant today in Scotland and northern Germany. A separate post-Ice Age migration carried haplogroup V through central Europe to western Russia and the Scandinavian Arctic.

Both Bono and Benjamin Franklin were Haplogroup V

My Paternal Haplogroup is R-L21 which is relatively common

haplogroup, R-L21, traces back to a man who lived less than 10,000 years ago.

That’s nearly 400 generations ago! What happened between then and now?
I have 295 Neanderthal variant genes in my make up, which is higher than 76% of 23andme customers. So there’s still a bit of caveman lurking around inside of me.
What the report does not show you is which parent your genes come from, but when compared with some cousins on my maternal line, an educated guess suggests that the North African and Oceanian lines are from the Honey line, although this is not a 100% certainty because of the vagueries of DNA. Your DNA is roughly split 50/50 with your parents, then 25/25/25/25 with your grandparents and so on, so 9 generations is divided up by roughly 5% per Great, great, great, great, great, great, great, great grandparent, push that on another generation and you down to 2.5% per grandparent. There will even be variations between siblings, however this will be slight. When we get into second cousins it gets even more disjointed, I have info from three second cousins on my maternal side and I only share between 5% – 2% DNA.
Still awake?
I doubt it.
Message Ends—————————————————————————————va

 

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